Books

Topics and Titles

Care Giver Challenges and Solutions

   "A Life Put on Hold"

   "Elder Rage - or Take my Father.....Please!"

Catheters

   "Secrets of Male Catheter Insertion"

Independent and Assisted Living

   "Insider's Guide to Assisted Living"

MediCaid

   "How to Protect Your Family's Assets from

   Devastating Nursing Home Costs"

Medicare

   "Medicare Demystified"

Nursing Home

   "Nursing Home Selection Guide"

Patient Advocacy

   "Ombudsman - What Happens in Nursing Homes"

MediCaid

Transportation
   Transportation is crucial to ensure that access to essential services such as medical care and grocery shopping. The availability of adequate transportation enables older persons to live independently in their communities, helps to prevent isolation and the possible need for long-term care placement. Many older people, who do not drive, must rely on family and friends provide much of the transportation. But for others, it is necessary to find community resources to provide transportation, as this vital support service may be their only connection to the outside world.
   Transportation services vary in communities depending upon where you live. Types of transportation that may be available for the elderly, is individual door- to- door service, fixed route with scheduled services, or ridesharing with volunteer drivers. A good place to start your search for transportation is your local Area Agency on Aging. In some communities the Area Agency on Aging arrange, monitor, and support programs that provide transportation for the elderly. Even if your local agency doesn't provide transportation services directly, they should be able to give assistance for finding help.
   Whether you are looking for yourself, a family member or a friend, consider what type of service would best meet your needs. Door -to-door service refers to transportation from one specific location to another, requiring advanced notice. This type of service is based upon demand and allows the most flexibility. Fixed route and scheduled services transport riders along an established route with predetermined stops at designated locations. Although this service provides less flexibility and fees on a per-ride basis (that may be discounted for seniors), advanced reservations are not required. Ridesharing programs generally arrange for older persons needing rides to be transported to specific destinations such as senior centers, adult day care, and health-related appointments with volunteer drivers.
   As mentioned, fees are usually required for many door-to-door services and on a fee per ride for fixed transportation services but often with senior discounted rates. Many communities have developed volunteer programs with minimal or no cost with the help and support of their local Area on Aging.
   The National Transit Hotline can provide the names of local transit providers who receive federal money to provide transportation to the elderly and people with disabilities. Call Toll Free 1-800-527-8279.

Independent and Assisted Living

Medicare

Patient Advocacy

Nursing Home

"Elder Rage - or- Take My Father...Please!"
   How to survive caring for aging parents.
   Are you at your wit's end with elder care? Eldercare expert (Eldercare / Alzheimer’s Speaker, Author, Radio Host, Caregiver Advocate), Jaqueline Marcell, answers your caregiving questions. A Book-of-the-Month selection, Elder Rage, is a unique combination non-fiction novel and self-help book. Order through Amazon, Barnes & Noble or Paypal

www.elderrage.com

MediCaid

Catheters

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Care Giver Challenges and Solutions

"A Life Put on Hold"
...is the story of my son, Seth who had behavioral, auditory and socialization challenges from the start, and yet when I questioned his odd behaviors, everyone around me told me I was imaging it, or making a big deal out of nothing. My son as it turned out, had Moyamoya. The disorder narrows the walls of a carotid artery in the brain, causing a decrease in blood flow. It’s likely that Seth was born with this condition, but no one even checked for it until severe headaches surfaced when he was 14. I believe many of his earlier issues were probably related to this condition.
   A Life Put on Hold discusses the lessons I, as Seth’s mother, advocate and conservator, have learned along the way and how it has helped shape my son’s life and ours.
   This is Seth’s story as seen through my eyes.
   “A Life Put on Hold: My Son’s Journey with Brain Injury and the Lessons I’ve Learned Along the Way” is available as an ebook on Amazon and other online sites.


www.alifeputonhold.com

​​​Topics of Interest
Scroll down to find the following topics

Affordable Housing
Alzheimer's/Dementia

Area Agency on Aging (AAA)
​Dental Care

Foot Care
​MediCaid
Transportation


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Affordable Housing
The federal government in the U.S. provides subsidies to make housing more affordable. Financial assistance is provided for homeowners through the mortgage interest tax deduction and for lower income households through housing subsidy programs.
Housing assistance from the federal government for lower income households can be divided into three parts:
1. Tenant based subsidies given to an individual household, known as the Section 8 program
   2. Project based subsidies given to the owner of housing units that must be rented to lower income households at affordable rates, and
   3. Public Housing, which is usually owned and operated by the government. (Some public housing projects are managed by subcontracted private agencies.) 
Project based subsidies are also known by their section of the U.S. Housing Act or the Housing Act of 1949, and include Section 8, Section 236, Section 221(d)(3), Section 202 for elderly households, Section 515 for rural renters, Section 514/516 for farmworkers and Section 811 for people with disabilities.
  There are also housing subsidies through the Section 8 program that are project based. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and USDA Rural Development administers these programs, and has further information on the particular programs on the agencies' respective web sites: HUD and USDA, Rural Development. HUD and USDA Rural Development programs have ceased producing large numbers of units since the 1980s. Since 1986, the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit program has produced a large share of the affordable units, however the affordability level in these units is less than the former HUD programs.
Some states and cities in the United States operate a variety of affordable housing programs, including supportive housing programs, transitional housing programs and rent subsidies as part of public assistance programs.

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Alzheimer's/Dementia

Alzheimer's Association National Office
225 N. Michigan Ave., Floor 17
Chicago, IL 60601
24/7 Helpline: 1.800.272.3900
www.alz.org 
Alzheimer's Association is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) organization.
© 2015 Alzheimer's Association. All rights reserved.


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Alzheimer’s Speaks
Founder Lori La Bey, CSA, COS, AOSAD 
651-748-4714

Recognized by Dr. Oz and Sharecare as the #1 Influencer Online for Alzheimer's!
Official Purple Angel Ambassador - Embrace A Global Symbol For Dementia - Ask me how to get involved!
Shifting Care-giving from Crisis to Comfort
Alzheimer’s Speaks Resource Website 
...is about giving voice and enriching lives by connecting those dealing with dementia to others on the same journey, as well as to helpful services, products and tools to allow them live fully with dementia.
https://www.alzheimersspeaks.com/
Alzheimer’s Speaks Radio™ 
...believes in giving voice to those afflicted with the memory loss and their care partners while empowering them to live purpose filled lives. Our goal is to raise awareness, give hope, and share the real everyday life of living with dementia. We look forward to you joining us for great conversation, learning, and laughter as we maneuver this roller coaster called memory loss.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/alzheimersspeaks
Alzheimer’s  Speaks Blog
...was developed for professional and public alike, to have easy access to a variety of services, tools, concepts and products when dealing with the disease.Alzheimer’s Speaks,  believes collaborative and alternative works push society forward in search for answers.  We believe working together, and sharing knowledge is the best way to win the battle against this disease and we invite you to explore our site.
https://alzheimersspeaks.wordpress.com/
Dementia Chats™
...Webinars - Voices of Those Diagnosed with Dementia.  Dementia Chats was created with the intention to educate people living with dementia; their care partners both family and friends as well as professionals and advocates.  Our Experts are those diagnosed with dementia.
https://www.alzheimersspeaks.com/dementia-chats-webinar
Memory & Alzheimer’s Café
...A social support for both those diagnosed and their care partners which allows them to connect with like-minded people on the same journey. 
https://www.alzheimersspeaks.com/memory-cafes
The Purple Angel Project
...Learn how to get involved with the new global symbol for dementia.  There is no cost and little time has to be invested! 
https://www.alzheimersspeaks.com/purple-angel-project
Learn about the Dementia Friendly Movement
...around the world and in your backyard.
https://www.alzheimersspeaks.com/become-dementia-friendly
Alzheimer’s Speaks Youtube Channel
...is where you can find helpful tips and insights when caring for someone with dementia.

https://www.youtube.com/user/AlzheimersSpeaks feature=mhee
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Area Agency on Aging (AAA)

   Area Agency on Aging (AAA) is a public or private non-profit agency, designated by the state to address the needs and concerns of all older persons at the regional and local levels. Area Agency on Aging is a generic term. Specific names of local AAAs may very. AAAs are primarily responsible for a geographic area, also known as a PSA, that is either a city, a single county or a multi-county district.

   AAAs may be categorized as: county, city, regional planning council or council of governments, or private, non-profit. AAAs coordinate and offer services that help older adults remain in their home - if that is their preference - aided by services such as Meals-on-Wheels, homemaker assistance and whatever else it may take to make independent living a viable option. By making a range of options available, AAAs make it possible for older individuals to choose the services and living arrangement that suit them best.
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Dental Care

   More people than ever have healthy teeth well into later life but the aging process does bring about its own set of medical problems. Elderly people are more susceptible to oral disease and this can bring about further medical complications and complaints. Many people are unaware that oral disease is closely related to their overall health and if oral disease is discovered it may well be that there are also other underlying medical problems. 
   Among the more common dental complaints of the elderly is a condition called dry mouth that occurs due to a reduction in the amount of saliva produced. Dry mouth can happen for a number or reasons with the most common being the amount and type of medication taken, it can also occur as the result of cancer treatments using radiation.  
   Root decay occurs as the gums recede from the teeth, the roots of the teeth are then more exposed to bacteria and more susceptible to decay. 
   After a lifetime of consuming food, drinking coffee, tea and other stain inducing liquids, older people will find that darkened teeth may be a problem. Darkened teeth can also be caused by changes to dentin, this is the tissue that lies beneath the tooth enamel. 
   Gum disease caused by plaque is a major factor in tooth loss and can occur due to a variety of reasons. Poorly fitted dentures, the use of tobacco, an unhealthy diet and food left between teeth will all enhance the risk of plaque. Diseases such as diabetes and cancer will also be common sources of gum disease. If gum disease is left untreated then it can cause other medical complaints such as heart and respiratory problems. 
   Good dental care for the elderly will take all of these problems into consideration and restorative measures by a dentist can be taken to ensure that the problems are treated and minimized. 
   Regular dental examinations for the elderly are vital in order to ensure that any oral diseases are caught in the early stages. When you visit your dentist for an examination he will take into consideration health complications that the elderly are susceptible to. If it has been a while since your last examination then the dentist should conduct a thorough oral examination and he will also ask questions on your medical history. The dentist will ask questions regarding your general oral health particularly if there has been any recent bleeding to your gums or swellings in your mouth. During the examination the dentist will check your face, neck, lymph nodes and salivary glands; this is quite normal as he will be looking for any swellings, lumps or discolouration to the skin. The dentist will then conduct a full oral examination of your mouth, gums and teeth, looking closely for any signs of gum disease or decaying or cracked teeth. If you wear dentures the dentist will also examine these for any signs of breakage or wear.  
   Daily dental care for older people should consist of a regular brushing and flossing routine. This should occur twice daily, once in the morning and before bed. Partial or full dentures should be cleaned thoroughly to ensure that no food is left on the dentures that can contribute to gum disease. 


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Foot Care
   These are some of the factors which must be considered when looking for appropriate shoe gear: Both feet should be measured with an appropriate measuring device. The Brannock measuring device is recommended since it measures both the length and the width of the foot. Most people have one foot larger than the other. Therefore, have both feet measured and make the shoe size equal to the larger foot.
   Shoes should be tried on with the socks, stockings or special inserts that have the correct thickness which would usually be worn with those shoes. Shoes should be checked for proper fit while standing. A space of 1/2 inch, equal to the width of a thumb, should be present between the longest toe and the end of the shoe. Walk in the shoes a few times to make sure they fit and feel right. The front of the shoe must be high enough so it does not rub against the top portion of the toes. It must also be round, square or spacious enough so it does not crumble the toes together. If the toes cannot be moved inside the shoe, then it is too small. The back part of the shoe must be more rigid and must have a snug fit with the heel area. The shoe must be wide enough to accommodate the widest part of the foot which is commonly across the ball of the foot. The shoe must not bend in any location other than the area at the ball of your foot. It must not bend at the middle or the arch area of the shoe. The shoe must not be completely flat and the heel must have between 1/4 to 1 inch of height. The innersole of the shoe must not be hard and rigid, and should be cushioned to​ absorb the pressure of walking on hard surfaces. It must also have some amount of arch support. Do not purchase shoes which feel too tight and then expect them to stretch later. If they are not comfortable, do not buy them. 
   It is better to look for shoes at the end of the day since that is the time when the feet are usually more swollen and larger. Shoes with laces or velcros are better since they can be adjusted for common swelling of the feet throughout the day. Have your feet measured and fitted each time you purchase shoes. The length and width of your feet change with age, weight changes, and other factors. Different shoe brands and styles have different sizes that are comparable to each other. Therefore, do not select shoes just by the size labeled inside them. Judge the shoes by how they fit on your feet. Do not insist you always wear one size if another size feels better. Women with big or wide feet should consider buying men's or boys' shoes which are usually wider. 
   High heels are fun and look good but should not be worn for a long period of time or for lengthy periods of walking. ​Avoid shoes which have seam lines over areas of pain such as bunions. 
   This educational reference is written and published exclusively by Dr. Giladi. It is derived from his own clinical experiences, current medical knowledge and various resources. It is presented as a public service and for informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. References correlate to their respective sources. 
   Babak A. Giladi, DPM, FAPWCA 11022 Santa Monica Boulevard, Suite 380 West Los Angeles, California 90025  Foot and Ankle Physician and Surgeon     Phone: (310) 928-8700      Fax: (310) 550-9020

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